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Object ID # 1991.054.010
Object Name Can
Title PRESTONE ANTI-FREEZE Tin
Lexicon category 5: T&E For Science & Technology
Date 1930s?
Year Range from 1930
Year Range to 1940
Made National Carbon Ltd.
Place of Origin Canada
Description One-gallon-sized tin can of PRESTONE ANTI-FREEZE, 1930s. The can is predominantly a pale blue colour, with navy blue and red highlights. The front and back of the can are the same, with a diamond-shaped patch of navy in the center along with two red rectangles. Within these shapes is white text. The top shape, a red rectangle, reads "Does Not Boil Away," while the middle blue diamond reads "Prestone Brand Antifreeze." The bottom red rectangle states that this product "Prevents Rust, Clogging, Corrosion -- Will Not Foam." Smaller, less conspicuous blue text describes the can as made in Canada and able to hold one imperial gallon. The blue diamonds wrap around to the sides, where additional product information is printed in blue text. Due to usage, the top of the can has been ripped open, leaving any marks on the lid difficult to discern.
Makers mark Printed
Provenance This item may date to the 1930s or 1940s. During the Second World War, the company used "wine jug-style" containers instead of the metal ones, as wartime metal shortages necessitated the change.

Belonged to J. Leonard Walsh, who owned an Imperial Oil garage in Dornoch, Grey County, starting in the 1920s. Passed to his nephew, Patrick Sweeney, who later worked with him in the garage. James Leonard Walsh died on June 5, 1986, in his 92nd year. He is buried at St. Paul's Cemetery in Grey County.
Collection Transportation, Automobiles & Equipment Collection
Material Lithographed Metal
Dimensions H-28.3 W-16.2 L-11 cm
Found Durham, Municipality of West Grey, Grey County
People Walsh, J. Leonard
Sweeney, Patrick
Function Antifreeze is a term that came into usage around 1924. It is a substance added to a liquid (as the water in an automobile engine) to lower its freezing point. [Webster's 9th New Collegiate Dictionary, 1985, p. 91]