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Object Record

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Object ID # 1959.002.046ab
Object Name Clock, Wall
Title Ansonia Clock Co. Mantel Clock
Lexicon category 5: T&E For Science & Technology
Date pre-1873
Year Range from 1860
Year Range to 1873
Artist The Ansonia Clock Co.
Made Ansonia Clock Co. (Ansonia Brass & Copper Co.)
Place of Origin Ansonia, Connecticut, United States of America
Description Wooden-cased Ansonia Clock Co. clock (a) with Masonic emblem on glass door front. There are galvanized metal clips that have been added to the back of this clock at the top, for mounting on a wall. Pendulum (b). IS THE KEY AND THE TWO WEIGHTS STILL WITH IT?
The clock has a dark-brown finished, veneered case, with a brass-hinged glass door. There is a cast door pull. The clock is weight-powered, with two lead weights. There is a single, curved steel gong. The clock has an anchor escapement mechanism. The pendulum is a plain, round brass one. The clock's dial is white with black Roman numerals, and pale brown trim. The minute and hour hands have a decorative openwork cross motif in it. The glass door has a clear upper area, a wooden divider, and then a lower area that centrally has a painted design of a Mason's compass and square (V-shaped ruler) with a central "G" or "C". The painted decor is gilt/blue/bluish-white and black. The top surface of the clock has two rectangular wooden covers with hollows. These covers cap the two wooden pulleys at the top. They are affixed with squarish-headed nails. A black-finished, circular item inside is embossed with lettering. The first part is hard to decipher, but "NEW YORK" is seen. Below the mechanism, behind the pendulum's position, there is a large black-printed label. It has an illustration of a building a decorative margin around the wording: "PATENT BRASS CLOCKS / MANUFACTURED BY THE / ANSONIA BRASS AND COPPER COMPANY, / ANSONIA, CONN. / WARRANTED GOOD".
"Directions for Setting the Clock Running and Keeping it in Order.
N.B.--The Clock can be set running without taking off the hands or dial plate. Put the Pendulum through the loop on the end of the wire at the bottom of the dial and hang it on the stud above.
Oil the pallets or ends commonly called the verge, the pin on which the verge plays, and the wire which carries the Pendulum at the place where it touches the rod. One drop of oil is sufficient for the whole.
Care should be taken not to wind the Clock until the cor--- is put upon the pulley in the partition and also on the top of the case and the weights put on. THE LIGHT WEIGHT ON THE STRIKE SIDE OF THE CLOCK.
To wind up the weights, put on the key with the handle down, turn towards the fig. 6, and turn steady until the weight is up.
If the hands want moving, do it by means of the longest, turning it any time forward, but never backward when the Clock is within fifteen minutes of striking; and in no case farther than to carry the minute hand to the fig. XII.
If the Clock should strike wrong in consequence of its running-down or other accident, it may be made to strike right by lifting a wire directly under fig. 7.
Directions for Regulating the Clock.
This is done by means of a screw at the bottom of the Pendulum. If the Clock should go too fast, lower the bail; If too slow, raise it."

The clock's label has a pencil notation on it "..24 Oct. 1873" and there also appears to be a signature, that might be "M. Forhan" (Michael Forhan was an Owen Sound, Ont. jeweller and watchmaker).

B. Clock Key
This appears to be the original clock key. It has a bent wire soldered to it.

Function: A timepiece like this would be sat on a clock shelf in one's home.
Makers mark Inside label: It has an illustration of a building a decorative margin around the wording: "PATENT BRASS CLOCKS / MANUFACTURED BY THE / ANSONIA BRASS AND COPPER COMPANY, / ANSONIA, CONN. / WARRANTED GOOD".
A black-finished, circular item inside is embossed with lettering. The first part is hard to decipher, but "NEW YORK" is seen.
Provenance This clock was owned by Mary Jane Givens (née Yates) 1853 - 1907, of the Holland Centre area of Grey County, and then by her younger son, James Givens (1875 - 1958) of Massie. Later owned by Mr. Givens' daughter, Jean (Mrs. William G. Reid, b. 1899-d. 1991).

The James R. Givens family farmed in the Massie area of Holland Township, Grey County. James and his wife Mary Ann "Minnie" (McKay) Givens are buried at Greenwood Cemetery in Owen Sound, Grey County.

The clock was manufactured by the Ansonia Brass & Copper Co. (Ansonia Clock Co.) of Ansonia, Connecticut. The handwritten date of "..24 Oct.1873" shows that the clock was manufactured before then. The signature also present looks like M.Forhan. Michael Forhan was an Owen Sound, Grey County jeweller and watchmaker who established his business in Owen Sound in 1865. Perhaps he had serviced the clock in 1873?. Mr. Forhan's business was still in operation in 1894, as he is listed still in a mercantile directory in that year.
Collection Horology, 19th-c Collection
Material Wood/Metal/Glass/Brass/Wire/Paint
Dimensions H-66.7 W-38.5 D-11 cm
Found Holland Township (formerly), Township of Chatsworth, Grey County
People Givens, Alex
Givens, James
Givens, Mary Ann
Reid, Jean
Subjects Clocks & watches