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Object Record

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Object ID # 2008.109.020abcdefgh
Object Name Set, Communion
Title Communion Glasses Set
Lexicon category 8: Communication Artifact
Date 20th-century
Artist The Westminster Press, Philadelphia
Made Westminster Press
Place of Origin Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States of America
Description Communion glasses and their stackable, silvertone metal trays (A to H). Each of the three perforated pieces holds forty colourless little wine glasses with flared tops (each about 4.5 cm high, approximately 3.8 cm at the top, 2.3 cm at the bottom). The set is about 32 cm in diameter.
A. Round lid with Maltese Cross lift knob (likely meant to sit over a bread tray).
B. Round tray.
C. Perforated insert to hold glasses, fits into "B".
D. Round tray. Underside has oval mark from "THE WESTMINSTER PRESS".
E. Metal insert with 40 holes.
F. Round tray. Underside has oval mark from "THE WESTMINSTER PRESS".
G. Metal insert with 40 holes.
H. Bottom round metal tray. Its underside has an oval mark in the center, stamped by "THE WESTMINSTER PRESS".
Makers mark See underside of "B" for impressed small oval mark with "THE WESTMINSTER / PRESS / PHILADELPHIA"
Provenance Manufactured by Westminster Press, in Philadelphia. Dates to the 20th-century. It belonged to Morrison United Church, in Cedarville, Grey County. The church was built on the site of a former church in 1899-1900; it was initially a Presbyterian Church, and became a United Church in 1924-1925. It was named in honour of the Reverend John Morrison, who was a Presbyterian minister in the area in the 19th-century. The church's last minister was Marianne Leach Hoffer. It closed in 2008.
Collection Religious Collection
Material Plated metal (aluminum?)/Glass
Found Cedarville, Township of Southgate, Grey County
Subjects Communion
Churches
Glassware
Search Terms Cedarville
Morrison United Church (Cedarville)
Function Communion sets provide equipment for the tradition of accepting the body and blood of Christ. They are ceremonial items.