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Object Record

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Object ID # 1959.002.050abcdefghijklm
Object Name Set, Flatware
Title Steel-Tined 19th-century Forks
Lexicon category 4: T&E For Materials
Date 19th-century?
Made Unknown
Place of Origin England, United Kingdom?
Description A set of fifteen antler and wood-handled steel-tined, 19th century forks (a-o). Unknown maker(s).
A. Fork has a blunt conical-shaped handle end and three steel tines (tines are very long).
B. Fork
C. Fork has a blunt conical-shaped handle end and three steel tines (tines are very long
C. Fork
D. Fork
E. Fork - This dinner fork has a dark wooden handle, possibly walnut? The handle tip has a circular, brass-coloured nail. The word "STEEL" is impressed on the reverse side of the shank. The three tines are very narrow and sharp.
F. Fork
G. Fork - This dinner fork has a wooden handle, possibly walnut? There is a metal shank. The handle becomes wider at its end, where it is tipped by a circular, brass-coloured metal nail. The fork has three tines, which are narrow and very sharp. When viewing the fork, the right-hand tine is slightly shorter than the other two, and its tip veers to the right (February 2010 - currently the metal is broken inside the wooden handle, therefore the fork is in two pieces with some collateral damage to the wood at the back of the handle).
H. Fork - This dinner fork has a light coloured wooden handle. The handle's tip once had a circular metal nail, but it is now missing. The word "STEEL" is impressed on the reverse side of the shank, but the "L" is missing there. The three tines are very long, narrow and sharp.
I. Fork - This dinner fork has three long, straight tines. It has a strung bone? antler? handle that has a pronounced curvation to it. Impressed on the back of the shank is "STEEL" There is a metal nail at the handles end.
J. Fork
K. Fork - This dinner fork has a light coloured wooden handle. The handle's tip once had a circular metal nail, but it is now missing. The word "STEEL" is impressed on the reverse side of the shank. The three tines are very narrow and sharp.
L. Fork - Fork has three long, straight tines which are all slightly bent at the tips (middle is bent forward, others are bent back). It has a light-coloured wooden handle. Impressed on the back of the shank is "STEEL" There is a metal nail at the handle's end.
M. Fork
N. Fork - This dinner fork has a grooved antler handle (reddish brown in colour) and three long pointed steel tines. The end of the steel part of the fork, connecting to the tines, comes out the end of the handle in two short prongs. "STEEL" is printed on the back of the shank (formerly marked x991.45.3).
O. Fork - This dinner fork has two long tines with a U-shaped void between them. Looking at the front, the right tine is slightly bent to the right. It has a strung bone? antler? handle that sandwiches a piece of metal affixed via three nails on each side running along the middle of hte handle. The handle has a pronounced curvation to it's end to the right.
Makers mark Only marked with "STEEL"
Provenance The set of forks belonged to ancestors of W. G. Reid. Mrs. Reid's maiden name was Jean Givens (b. 1899-d.1991) and she was a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James Givens of Massie, Holland Township, Grey County. Her mother was formerly Mary Ann "Minnie" McKay. James and Mary Ann were married in 1898. Mary Ann's parents were John and Margaret Murray McKay, who were married at Chatsworth, Grey County. in 1869.

Her husband's parents were Mr. and Mrs. George Inglis Reid of the Walter's Falls district, and the last owner said that these forks were used by this couple during their married life. Mrs. George I. Reid was the former Miss Clara Milson of Euphrasia Township, Grey County (m.1898).
Collection Food Service Tools & Equipment
Material Metal/Wood/Antler
Found Holland Township (formerly), Township of Chatsworth, Grey County
People Reid, George Inglis
Reid, Clara
Reid, W. G.
Reid, Jean
Subjects Kitchens
Dining tables
Function Flatware suitable for ordinary every-day dining use